Exploring Lamanai

Rachel and I just completed 6 weeks at Belize Bird Rescue. It has been quite an experience. During our time there we received 16 intakes and we are pretty amazed at how much we handled – and mostly by ourselves – though Dr Shannon Riggs was always just an email away. Our bare-throated tiger heron was released, our white hawk will be released next week. Our barn owl babies are growing like weeds on a diet of chicken with bones, beef and rat, and should be released in 2-3 weeks. Our nighthawk from Placencia caused some trouble – it came in with a fractured coracoid which healed beautifully and then during a very loud thunderstorm it fractured its mandible in its reptarium. We fashioned a splint out of a plastic q-tip and tegaderm, amazingly, the fracture actually healed, and that bird was released. One of the non-releasable aracaris developed a pretty severe infection in its hocks at the beginning of our stay and not only did we get the infection under control, the bird also regained full range of motion. All of the parrots that came in are settled and doing well. This experience has actually been quite incredible. We went from a center that has everything available to a center with very little available (most of the things we are used to are just not in Belize) and not only did we cope, we did well. We are both so very thankful for this experience and I have a feeling we will both be back in the future.

Yesterday Devin and Matt flew in to Belize, we met them at the airport and then headed to Orange Walk in northern central Belize. We are staying at Hotel de la Fuenta, a nice little hotel in the middle of Orange Walk with a very helpful and friendly staff. Today we took a boat about 20 miles up New River to the Mayan settlement of Lamanai. The boat ride was incredible – we saw so many birds! And bats, and crocodiles and monkeys! We were the first ones the boat picked up and Rachel informed the captain that we are bird people, so he went out of his way to look for birds for us and stop the boat as he could. It was amazing.

Once we reached the ruins we stopped at the picnic tables and enjoyed a lunch of rice and beans and stewed chicken. We then toured the small museum at the site and hiked through the jungle to the temples. We saw three different temples, a residential area and a ball court – though the guide told us that there are more than 700 buildings in the area. He also informed us that they are not allowing access to all of them because they want to save them for future generations. The first temple was the Mask Temple which had two large carved faces on either side of the stairs. Rachel, Devin, Matt and I all climbed to the top where we had a really nice view of the river. The second temple was the High Temple at a towering 108 feet – it is the third tallest structure in the Mayan world. I climbed about halfway up and once seeing that a rope was needed to get to the very top, decided I was fine where I was. The rest of our group did make it to the top – I heard the view was incredible and that you could see Mexico and Guatemala from that vantage point. The next area was called the Royal Complex where we saw the foundations of a village which opened to a large field and the Temple of the Jaguar Masks. On either side of the stairs of that temple there are images of jaguars – though you do need to use your imagination a bit to see them. I thought that this temple was the most impressive – it was beautiful and it appeared to have a tree coming up out of the top of it. This completed our tour and we went back on the boat.

On the boat ride back to Orange Walk, the boat took a loop in the river that we had passed on the way up. We stopped at a bend where a spider monkey was swinging through the trees. Our guide handed a passenger on the boat a banana to give to the monkey – which the monkey happily accepted. This kind of thing is very common in Belize but unfortunately these “friendly” animals often are captured and kept at resorts or stores to impress tourists. It is illegal to own a monkey in Belize and we know that the Forest Department has done several dozen monkey confiscations in the last two months. There is a monkey rehabilitation group in northern Belize called WIldTreks and that is where all the monkeys go. It takes several years to get a tamed monkey back out into the wild – just as it does with parrots.

Along the river we also saw a sugar factory. Sugar cane is a big part of Orange Walk, it is harvested and processed here. We learned it takes 10 tons of sugar cane to produce 1 ton of sugar. They load the raw sugar (or the molasses) on to barges in the river and send the barges to Belize City where the product is exported. Some of it goes to Europe and the US, the rest of it stays in Belize and goes towards making rum and stout.

Tomorrow we will be going to the Baboon Sanctuary (the locals call the howler monkeys baboons) and another Mayan site, Altun Ha. On Saturday we will go our separate ways, with Devin and Rachel headed to Caye Caulker and Matt and I headed to Ambergris Caye for snorkeling and hanging out on the beach! We are looking forward to it!

New River scenery.

New River scenery.

Devin enjoying the boat ride!

Devin enjoying the boat ride!

Snail kite! We saw so many today, males and females. We even saw one get in the water and catch a snail!

Snail kite! We saw so many today, males and females. We even saw one get in the water and catch a snail!

Purple gallinule! Apparently a rare bird to see along the river! The water lilies were very beautiful too - on our way up the river the flowers were all opened to the sun, on our way back, they were all closed.

Purple gallinule! Apparently a rare bird to see along the river! The water lilies were very beautiful too – on our way up the river the flowers were all opened to the sun, on our way back, they were all closed.

Insect bats lining the tree. The guide put the boat right up against the tree so we could see them.

Insect bats lining the tree. The guide put the boat right up against the tree so we could see them.

Green iguana! Saw several of these guys climbing trees along the river.

Green iguana! Saw several of these guys climbing trees along the river.

Green heron - there were many egrets and herons along the river.

Green heron – there were many egrets and herons along the river.

Morelet's crocodile on a log.

Morelet’s crocodile on a log.

We were very excited to see this adult bare-throated tiger heron - the striping along the neck and back is remarkable.

We were very excited to see this adult bare-throated tiger heron – the striping along the neck and back is remarkable.

A Northern jacana. The undersides of its wings are bright yellow.

A Northern jacana. The undersides of its wings are bright yellow.

So many kingfishers! The one on top is a ringed kingfisher - coloration is similar to a belted but the bird is much bigger. Below is a female green kingfisher. We also saw pygmy kingfishers - though they didn't cooperate for pictures.

So many kingfishers! The one on top is a ringed kingfisher – coloration is similar to a belted but the bird is much bigger. Below is a female green kingfisher. We also saw pygmy kingfishers – though they didn’t cooperate for pictures.

One of the bridges over the river had this Mayan art work on the supports.

One of the bridges over the river had this Mayan art work on the supports.

The most awesome bird we saw all day - the boat-billed heron! Check out that bill, it is huge! I would love to see one of these up close.

The most awesome bird we saw all day – the boat-billed heron! Check out that bill, it is huge! I would love to see one of these up close.

Entrance to Lamanai

Entrance to Lamanai

Pale-billed woodpecker! Huge woodpecker (like a pileated) with beautiful markings and a bright red head.

Pale-billed woodpecker! Huge woodpecker (like a pileated) with beautiful markings and a bright red head.

I believe this is a snake cactus around a guanacaste tree. So beautiful in person.

I believe this is a snake cactus around a guanacaste tree. So beautiful in person.

The Mask Temple. The Masks have actually been covered by fiberglass replicas to protect the actual structures underneath.

The Mask Temple. The Masks have actually been covered by fiberglass replicas to protect the actual structures underneath.

Rachel climbing the Mask Temple.

Rachel climbing the Mask Temple.

Mom and baby howler monkey at the High Temple.

Mom and baby howler monkey at the High Temple.

The High Temple. If you look closely you can see Devin at the top left, with Rachel and Matt near the center.

The High Temple. If you look closely you can see Devin at the top left, with Rachel and Matt near the center.

This is the Temple of the Jaguar Masks.

This is the Temple of the Jaguar Masks.

This is the image of the jaguar that is on either side of the stairs of the Temple of the Jaguar Masks. If you look closely you might be able to see the jaguar face staring back at you.

This is the image of the jaguar that is on either side of the stairs of the Temple of the Jaguar Masks. If you look closely you might be able to see the jaguar face staring back at you.

Sugar factory

Sugar factory

Barges loaded with raw sugar. When all of the barges are loaded a tug boat takes them down the New River.

Barges loaded with raw sugar. When all of the barges are loaded a tug boat takes them down the New River.

Spider monkey - very friendly, definitely knew what time to arrive to get its banana.

Spider monkey – very friendly, definitely knew what time to arrive to get its banana.

 

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